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Thursday, February 28, 2008

The trouble with being Earnest...

There are just some things that you can't talk straight to people about. It's a weird adult sort of thing where we just don't like being preached to and - for the most part - will rebel very strongly against any sort of advice that comes off as 'telling us what to do'.

I guess the days of Dontcha Put It In Your Mouth are over.

Needless to say, as a storyteller or otherwise, if you have a 'message' that you want to get across you've really got your work cut out for you if you can't figure out a way to hide it. A while back I heard some writers talking about how proud they were of being able to make shows that allowed them to sneak their message home and still ended up being successful; As if that alone was some sort of miracle/holy grail (which I'm sure it is).

So what do you do when you have a message to share and you're left fighting both ignorance and apathy as well? In this case, the CRTC and the CTF fiasco. How do you make people care without beating them over the head? How do you share a message without having your audience hit the automatic 'tune-out' button? Sure you can do a song and dance number or make them bust a gut about just how screwed they're getting - but at the end of the day they may still not care.

That must be the one true torture of being a writer: having something important to say, having something you feel is necessary for people to know and yet having John Q. Public say "Meh" when you finally get it out.

I'm not quite sure how other writers do it, maybe it's something I'll discover as I go along, as my skills develop: how best to ninja my point into my works.

Though maybe that's why comedy is such an effective tool in storytelling, in making people laugh you're more likely to build a rapport as opposed to being the wild-eyed guy on the corner pointing dirty fingers and muttering from a soapbox.

Basically, I've gotta strive to be the Canadian TV equivalent of Banksy.

Right. No pressure.

Cheers,
Brandon

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